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New Year Committee wants to give thanks to all the volunteers for your commitment, dedication and patience; and our proud sponsors for your donation and other resources
PARTICIPATING GROUPS:
  • San Jose Cambodian Buddhist Society (SJCBS)
  • Cambodian American Resource Agency (CARA)
  • Santa Clara Valley Cambodian Women’s Association (SCVWA)
  • Khmer Cultural Dance Program
  • Apsara of San Jose Company
  • Cambodian School
  • Active Community Members
  • VOLUNTEERS:

    1. Aimee Boun
    2. Alina Bun
    3. Amanda Whalen
    4. Amanda Yean
    5. Andy Ho
    6. Andy Mam
    7. Angel Sar
    8. Angelina Each
    9. Asley Buck
    10. Bodavid Kas
    11. Bora Each
    12. Bunrith Yean
    13. Cameron Moore
    14. Chamroeun Yean
    15. Chandneary Buck
    16. Channary Bill
    17. Chanthoeun To
    18. Chenda Hiep
    19. Chheng Ang
    20. Chhunnary Each
    21. Christopher Dean
    22. Cindy Nguyen
    23. Corina Pen
    24. Dany Sok
    25. Dara Y. Kas
    26. David Lee
    27. Davy Chea
    28. Dee Dean
    29. Deva Ok
    30. Elizabeth Liu
    31. Eric Bin
    32. Eric Romero
    33. Fran Khuon
    34. Huot Chan
    35. Jackie Men
    36. Jackie Romero
    37. James Mundstock
    38. Jennifer Chan
    39. Jennifer Tran
    40. Jennilee Gomez
    41. Joallan Castada
    42. Johnny Ho
    43. Joycelyn Tran
    44. Julia Daniels
    45. Julie Dean
    46. Jurisa Prom
    47. Kaine Lim
    48. Kameron Collins
    49. Katherine Lor
    50. Kelvin So
    51. Kenitha Keo Yim
    52. Kent Kuoy
    53. Keo Yim
    54. Kha Bun
    55. Khanphiry Keo
    56. Kim Ang
    57. Kim Heng
    58. Kimny Chhon
    59. Laura Mam
    60. Layso Lor
    61. Leakena Keo Yim
    62. Leakhena Howey
    63. Leslie Kim
    64. Lillian Pannthay
    65. Lily Ngar
    66. Linda Khuon
    67. Mearadey Ngak
    68. Monica Bun
    69. Monica Chan
    70. Monica Pen
    71. Monita Pen
    72. Mony Chan
    73. Narith Bun
    74. Nathan Buck
    75. Nepar Penn
    76. Nithya Nine
    77. Norind Su
    78. Oulisany Chea
    79. Paul Lon
    80. Perom Uch
    81. Phanara Each
    82. Phillip Lim
    83. Pok Mao
    84. Puthy Chea
    85. Raline Von-Buelow
    86. Rasmei Buth
    87. Ratha Nou
    88. Rattany Hort
    89. Ravich Taing
    90. Ravida Bin
    91. Rictor Smith
    92. Rith Sek
    93. Ryan Ith
    94. Sam Chang
    95. Sambo Ouch
    96. Savary Dean
    97. Savath Or
    98. Savouth Chea
    99. Shawdina Meas
    100. Sineth
    101. Sinuon Buth
    102. Sochealy So
    103. Sok Leng Lim
    104. Sok Ly
    105. Sokha Daniels
    106. Sokly Ea
    107. Somala Ang
    108. Somalen Sam
    109. Somony Sam
    110. Son Each
    111. Sonia Meas
    112. Sophat Bun
    113. Sopheap Ngar
    114. Sopheavy Bun
    115. Sophia Pannthay
    116. Sophoeun Bun
    117. Soun Yeay
    118. Sovutta Sar
    119. Steven M. Kas
    120. Sydney Meng
    121. Tahry Ros
    122. Taxi Khek
    123. Thai Yean
    124. Thida Mam
    125. Tino Tuy
    126. Tony Tu
    127. Van Chek
    128. Vearady Chea To
    129. Veasna Chea
    130. Veronica Ho
    131. Vinita Kylin
    132. Vitou Mam
    133. Zaneta Bin

       

     

     
          
     
    Highlights of Cambodian New Year 2004, San Jose, Bay Area, N. California

    TABLES OF CONTENTS
  • Morning Program: 8AM - 2PM
  • Evening Program - 5PM - Midnight
  • New Year 2004 Committee

  • (Photos donated by Mr. Kelvin So)
     
    EVENING PROGRAM: 5PM - MIDNIGHT
     
    Masters of Ceremony: Miss. Monica and Dr. Steven M. Kas National Anthems
         

      Mr. Kaine Lim, Chairperson Mr. Perom Uch - VP of CARA
    Congressman Micheal M. Honda - His Message to Cambodian New Year
     
    Robam Choun Por - Blessing Dance

    This dance is performed at the official opening ceremony offering wishes to the audience. It is the dance of greetings and good wishes that describe the name of this dance. In this classical piece the lyrics and gestures describe the wishes of happiness. Flower petals are tossed gently from small golden trays as a way of blessing the audience and the event.

         
    Poem Reading - by Ms. Sopheap Ngar
    A poem “Sour-Sdey-Chhnam-Thmey”, meaning “Happy New Year”, written by Elder Bun Ho So. This poem was written in April 1979 right after he and his families came to the US. It is an Advising and a Wishing poem to all Khmer people who began their lives in America.
         
    Robam Kan-Seng-Sneih – Magic Scarf Dance

    was created in 1967 by the staff of the Fine Arts University of Phnom Phenh, Cambodia. This dance illustrates the tradition of the minority Khmer-Islam people.The ladies use the charm in their magic scarves to flirt with the men. The men are then under the influence of the love charm.

         
    Robam Priep-San-Te-Pheap – White Doves of Peace Dance

    The white dove or pigeon is a symbol of peace. Dancers are typically young children dressing in white bird costumes. They dance for peace in the world. The lyrics and the dancers movements narrate the call for peace in the world.

         
    Robam Apsara – The Apsara Dance

    This royal ballet was originally performed at the offering ceremonies and other palace celebrations during the Angkorian Era. In the 1950’s Cambodian Queen Sisowath Kossomak Nearyrath, King Sihanouk’s mother, was the inspiration behind the genesis of the Apsara dance.

    The significance of this dance is the meaning behind every movement. Each gesture symbolizes something meaningful, such as love or peace. Arms crossed over the chest means very happy. The left arm stretches out behind while the right hand raises up at the chest with three fingers up and the index finger touching the thumb to depict the Naga, the great serpent that symbolizes the spirit of the Cambodian people.

    The dance portrays Princess Mera, white Apsara, dancing in her garden. Her maidens, also Apsaras, who made flower garlands and flower sashes, join her. Their circular movements, poised motions, and lightness of their gestures, all symbolize their hovering between the heaven and earth.

         
    Robam Meh-Am-Bao - Butterfly Dance

    This dance is a classical piece originally choreographed by Queen Sisowath Kossamak Nearyrath. The dance portrays the male and female butterflies that flirt while flying and singing their mutual love.

         
    Robam Preah Sothun – Prince Sothun Dance

    a classical royal court dance founded on a mythical story of Prince Sothun and Princess Keo Monorea. The huntsman points out to Preah Sothun the waterfall that is often visited by seven female angels from the heaven above.

         
    Robam Koah-Ang-Reh – The Pestle Dance

    This folk dance represents the happy time of Cambodian peasants after the harvest season. It is a tradition that right after harvest time peasants typically celebrate to thank the heaven for giving them their crops. The celebration is also to have fun after the hard work. Wood pestles are used to manually extract rice. For this dance, two long wood pestles are clapped together as the dance instruments. They first begin with the folk song describing the happiness of being born as Cambodian peasants.

         

    Cambodian children born and raised in America typically have a hard time speaking and understanding the Cambodian language. As parents, we have an obligation to teach our children this language.

    A classical song with lyrics from one of the dances called “Bopha Lokey” or “Flowers of the World”. This song, accompanied by Mr. Chheng Ang flute, is sung by a group of young girls: Leakena, Somalen, Angelina, Veronica, & Angel.

     

    Poem Reading - by Sambo Uch
    A poem called “Chhor-Bab-Peik-Chass” meaning “Advising Poem” written by Mr. Vanthoun Buth. This poem is read by Sambo Uch. Sambo is currently a college student. He also attends a Saturday class to learn his Cambodian language.
    A popular song called “Kramom Srok Sreh” or “Peasant girls”, sung by 7 years old Aimee Boun.

    Short Play - Mak Thoeung Scene

    This short scene illustrates a love story of Mak Thoeung. He was a peasant man, smart and kind. His beautiful new bride, Meuy Cheuy, was much younger than him. Both make a living by selling perfume and makeup materials. The first scene begins where Mak Thoeung and his bride are on their daily tour to market their merchandise. The second scene happens when Prince Pya Noy, who had spotted Meuy Cheuy at the market during his visit there, approaches her at the water pond while she tries to get water. He flirts with her and persuades her to fall in love with him. She asks him to excuse her because she is now a married woman.

         
     
         
    Dancing with Live Band until Midnight
    Performed by Sek Meas Band and Ms. Im Sreypeov

         
         
     

    Cambodian New Year Festival Committee is a not for profit organization. Your Support Is Greatly Appreciated.

    PROUD SPONSORS

    Artis Council

    San Jose Cambodian Buddhist Society


    PG & E

    Grand Fortune Restaurant
    5400 Monterey Road, San Jose, Ca 95111

    Chez Sovan Restaurant
    2425 S. Bascom Ave.
    Campbell, CA 95008-4302
    Phone: 408/371-7711
    For more | Cambodian Beef Sticks | Virtual Tourist
    Chez Sovan in Hawaii - Star Bullitin


    Huot Meng Tran & Vatey Ponya Roth 5537 Cabrillo Sorte, San Jose, Ca 94803

     


    Bo Town Seafood Restaurant

    409 S. 2nd St. San Jose, Ca - 408-295-2125

     


    Denise's Donuts

    4138 Monterey hwy, San Jose, 95111

     

    Mr. Sokhom Hiek
    &
    Family

    Jeffry P Ngar & Sophea Ngar
    125 Lancelot Lane
    San Jose, Ca 95127

     


    Tech Ky

     

    More coming...